Tag Archives: patrick o’brian

2016 Reading Update, September

I’ve met my target of reading 26 books this year, with a few months left to keep reading in. Since my last update I’ve added seven more books to my total, four of which are Patrick O’Brian books – and I’ll finish the series before next update, library stock permitting.

The list so far

Here’s what the list looks like after the last update in July:

  1. Cadfael: Monk’s Hood by Ellis Peters (Edith Parteger)
  2. Cadfael: St Peter’s Fair by Ellis Peters (Edith Parteger)
  3. Key Under Blue Pot and Please Milk the Goat by Marie Sever
  4. Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
  5. Cadfael: The Leper of St Giles by Ellis Peters (Edith Parteger)
  6. The Fire Mages’ Daughter by Pauline M Ross
  7. Cadfael: The Virgin in the Ice by Ellis Peters (Edith Parteger)
  8. The Mages of Bennamore by Pauline M Ross
  9. The A to Z of You and Me by James Hannah
  10. The Plains of Kallanash by Pauline M Ross
  11. The Magic Mines of Asharim by Pauline M Ross
  12. The Morville Hours by Katherine Swift
  13. The Wheel of Osheim by Mark Lawrence
  14. Echoes of the Great Song by David Gemmell
  15. The Dragon’s Egg by Pauline M Ross
  16. The Reverse of the Medal by Patrick O’Brian
  17. The Letter of Marque by Patrick O’Brian
  18. The Errant Hours by Kate Innes
  19. Iceland Defrosted by Edward Hancox
  20. Touch of Iron by Timandra Whitecastle
  21. The Thirteen-Gun Salute by Patrick O’Brian
  22. The Nutmeg of Consolation by Patrick O’Brian
  23. A Star-Reckoner’s Lot by Darrell Drake

Continue reading 2016 Reading Update, September

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2016 Reading Update, July

We’re just past half way through the year and I’m well ahead of target. By last update, back in May, I’d already raced past the half-way point on my goal, and now I’m closing in on the finish line (not that I’ll stop when I reach 26, where would the fun be in that?) So let’s see what I’ve been reading lately.

The list so far

Here’s what I’ve covered in previous updates:

  1. Cadfael: Monk’s Hood, by Ellis Peters (Edith Parteger)
  2. Cadfael: St Peter’s Fair, by Ellis Peters (Edith Parteger)
  3. Key Under Blue Pot and Please Milk the Goat, by Marie Sever
  4. Rebecca, by Daphne du Maurier
  5. Cadfael: The Leper of St Giles, by Ellis Peters (Edith Parteger)
  6. The Fire Mages’ Daughter by Pauline M Ross
  7. Cadfael: The Virgin in the Ice by Ellis Peters (Edith Parteger)
  8. The Mages of Bennamore by Pauline M Ross
  9. The A to Z of You and Me by James Hannah
  10. The Plains of Kallanash by Pauline M Ross
  11. The Magic Mines of Asharim by Pauline M Ross
  12. The Morville Hours by Katherine Swift
  13. The Wheel of Osheim by Mark Lawrence
  14. Echoes of the Great Song by David Gemmell
  15. The Dragon’s Egg by Pauline M Ross
  16. The Reverse of the Medal by Patrick O’Brian
  17. The Letter of Marque by Patrick O’Brian

Recent Reads

And here’s what I’ve read since May’s post:

18. The Errant Hours by Kate Innes

Set largely in Shropshire, this book falls under my “local reads” sub-goal. It’s an historical adventure/romance following Illesa, an impoverished young woman with nothing to her name but a valuable book, and no family but a brother in need of rescue. An exciting and enjoyable read, made all the more special by the familiar setting.

19. Iceland Defrosted by Edward Hancox

Two in a row for “local reads”, as Ed is from Shropshire. I bought this book a couple of years ago at his book launch in the local library but only just got around to actually reading it. It’s written in a casual, friendly tone, with the author’s love for Iceland raw on the page, and I though I’ve never been there I found I was falling in love with Iceland too thanks to the sincerity of Ed’s prose and the lively descriptions of the places he visited.

20. Touch of Iron by Timandra Whitecastle

I reviewed this fantastic novel in full here. It’s a brilliantly woven tale packed with excitement, with a thoroughly relatable protagonist and a rich world. I can’t praise it enough, and I hope it does well in the Self-Published Fantasy Blog Off 2016, which I think is a fantastic way of showcasing the best indie fantasy around.

21. The Thirteen-Gun Salute by Patrick O’Brian

and

22. The Nutmeg of Consolation by Patrick O’Brian

Yes, I’m still reading them in pairs. When O’Brian ends a novel with his protagonists stranded on a deserted island, how can I not immediately read the next? I’m really loving this series and when I finally get to the end I will no doubt start again at the beginning. It took some getting into when I first started reading it, but now I’m more familiar with O’Brian’s style, and less likely to give up on books than I was back in 2009 when I started reading the series, I am certain I will enjoy those first few books more on a second reading than I did on the first.

23. A Star-Reckoner’s Lot by Darrell Drake

I’m counting this. I read it, it counts. Darrell has employed me to proofread his novel and so that is what I have done. Towards the end I had to consciously slow down and remind myself to pay attention to the words, how they’re spelled, how they’re punctuated, the syntax and flow, and so on, because my mind wanted to race ahead and find out how it would end. The first two thirds of the novel is a bit slow burn, plenty going on but it’s difficult to see where it’s heading, but the seeds are sown and once they sprout quite a tale unfolds. Look out for it when it comes out, folks. Here’s Darrell’s website if you’re interested.

Up next

If my local library can get in the book I am looking for, I’ll have a few Charles Stross titles popping up in my next few reading updates. And there are a few books on my shelf I really should get around to reading at some point. Plus if anyone else on the SPFBO 2016 wants to send me a free ARC I’ll definitely be receptive to that.

2016 reading update, May

I’m nearly half way through the year now – and it feels like it’s gone very quickly. But so has my reading, so I’m well ahead of target. I have read 17 books so far, which beats my total for the whole of 2015.

The list so far

In my previous updates I have discussed the following:

  1. Cadfael: Monk’s Hood, by Ellis Peters (Edith Parteger)
  2. Cadfael: St Peter’s Fair, by Ellis Peters (Edith Parteger)
  3. Key Under Blue Pot and Please Milk the Goat, by Marie Sever
  4. Rebecca, by Daphne du Maurier
  5. Cadfael: The Leper of St Giles, by Ellis Peters (Edith Parteger)
  6. The Fire Mages’ Daughter by Pauline M Ross
  7. Cadfael: The Virgin in the Ice by Ellis Peters (Edith Parteger)
  8. The Mages of Bennamore by Pauline M Ross
  9. The A to Z of You and Me by James Hannah
  10. The Plains of Kallanash by Pauline M Ross
  11. The Magic Mines of Asharim by Pauline M Ross

Recent reads

12. The Morville Hours by Katherine Swift

This is a non-fiction book about the development of a garden from a field to the beautiful selection of settings it now is, all mixed in with local history and history of the house it is connected to, some history of British Christianity, and a little bit of autobiography too. It’s a well-written and fascinating book, and it was easy to follow even for someone like me, who can’t keep a basil plant alive in the kitchen window. Swift has really done her research. And when her garden was open as part of May Day celebrations two weeks ago, I went to visit it (it’s only a short drive away from me), got the book signed and bought the second one, The Morville Year.

13. The Wheel of Osheim by Mark Lawrence

How could I read in April that which isn’t to be released until June? I got an Advanced Review Copy. And Review it I shall, soon. But not here.

14. Echoes of the Great Song by David Gemmell

I read Gemmell a lot from when I was about 17 to about when I was 21, by which point there were very few of his books I hadn’t read. This was one of them. I found it in the library while looking for something else and of course had to read it. I found it a little difficult to get into at first – there are a lot of terms and concepts to get to grips with – but once it had got going I enjoyed the way the story developed, which Gemmell’s characterstic cast of moral greys fighting against the moral black standing against them.

15. The Dragon’s Egg by Pauline M Ross

I recieved an ARC of this book and reviewed it here. It’s one that has lingered in my mind, where I still think of the ending and the points earlier in the book that foreshadow it. Absolutely masterful.

16. The Reverse of the Medal by Patrick O’Brian

and

17. The Letter of Marque by Patrick O’Brian

Finally I have got back to this fantastic series. I love reading about Captain Jack Aubrey and Doctor Stephen Maturin and their various adventures and escapades on land and sea. They are written in quite a different style and with a different approach to most novels, which is refreshing. The voices of the characters come through wonderfully strongly, and it really feels like I’m reading about the lives of real people, with their marital concerns, financial troubles and all. The concept of a plot as charted and diagrammed on various writing forums seems rigid and ritualised compared to the more fluid, more life-like sequence of events of O’Brian’s books.

As happens surprisingly often, I finished one and bought the next immediately. They seem to come in pairs, one ending abruptly on a low or neutral point, with questions of how the protagonists might recover, the second ending on a high point that feels more natural an ending. I was, as I finished reading The Letter of Marque, laughing out loud at every second paragraph, as much because of the humour (the subtle humour that comes about as a result of knowing these characters well and recognising when they are fooling themselves) as because of the general sense of happiness on which the book ended.

Up next

I’ve got a library book that needs to go back soon: The Errant Hours by Kate Innes, an historical fiction novel set in nearby Much Wenlock, another one I sought as part of my “read local” aims, but which seems to be within my normal reading patterns too, with a setting not too dissimilar to the Cadfael books. So that’s next.

I shall shortly be posting my review of The Wheel of Osheim by Mark Lawrence, and I’d quite like to look back over the previous books of the trilogy to remind myself of them and perhaps have a few more things to say about the first two books without restricting myself to a spoiler-free review.