Tag Archives: new years resolution

It’s 2019 and I’ve got Goals with a capital G

Happy New Year, everyone! My regular followers might have noticed that my output in 2018, and for that matter in 2017, hasn’t exactly been high. Part of that, I think, was fatigue around blogging and part was having quite a lot else on to worry about in my personal life. But 2019 is going to be different. Honest. While a lot of 2018’s worries haven’t gone away, with a new year comes a fresh outlook.

This is a quick update about my goals for the year and what I’ve got planned. So let’s get right to it.

Reading

Last year was a dismal year for me as far as reading was concerned. I barely read anything and didn’t review what I did read. This year I’ll do better. I’ve set a goal on Goodreads to read 24 books in 2019 – that’s two per month. And I don’t think I’ll have any trouble finding 24 books to read, between my “to read” pile (utterly massive) and the books coming out this year that I’m excited about (loads of them). I plan on reviewing any fantasy novels I read right here, but I’ll keep track of everything else – which is likely to include historical fiction and loads of non-fiction – with quarterly updates on my progress towards my 24 book goal, much like I did back in 2016.

Writing

I’ve been hard at work in the last few months working out what I want from my current novel. I now have a working title – Feud and Fire – as well as a general outline, a lot of notes about themes, particular plotlines, character and the world, and at the end of December I started the latest draft. I am happy with where I am with this story. My goal for 2019 is to write it, edit it and get it to a refined final state. Whether I then consider submitting for publication or decide there’s more work to be done is something I’ll decide when I get to that point.

I am also planning on writing some short fiction in 2019. I spend so much time working on these big novels, that a short break after finishing the Feud and Fire draft would be an ideal time to practice a shorter format, especially since I have enjoyed reading short fiction in 2018 (just about the only type of story where I have read more than previous years, thanks to the Daily Science Fiction emails I receive) and it’s been a while since I’ve written any.

Later this week I’ll be taking a look at how things stand for my One Million Words Challenge. I started it back in 2015 but stopped keeping track of it after a while. I have, however, continued to date each new document I create and each day of handwritten fiction in my notebooks, so it should only take an hour or two to get a fairly good idea of my overall total, by simply adding up the wordcounts of the numerous documents I have created since I started and adding an estimate of the handwritten stuff based on multiplying an average page wordcount by the number of pages.

Blogging

Yep, this is something I’m planning on increasing this year. I can hardly do worse than last year, so I’ve got that going for me. But in fact I’ve got a few ideas planned out, and with all that reading I’ll be doing there are bound to be a few reviews at the very least.

So that’s the plan for this year.

What about you? Do you have reading and writing goals for 2019? What are they? How do you think you’ll do? Did you meet your 2018 goals?

Delving into myth

One of my New Year’s Resolutions relates to the articles I write for Mythic Scribes. In 2014 I started working on a series called Magical Creatures for Magical Worlds, in which I am looking at mythical creatures that are sometimes used in fantasy fiction. It’s a topic that interests me because it involves delving into the stories of past cultures and finding out how those stories changed over time and were reinterpretted by modern authors and creators. It gives me the opportunity to use things I learned at university – and books I purchased for my degree.

mythic scribes header

The problem is that in 2014, I didn’t really push myself on those articles. I wrote them in a hurry, a few hours in the days before the deadline by which they were meant to be published. What resulted was research which was too shallow – someone even accused me of sounding like a Wikipedia page for the Fairies article. With the Minotaur article I was definitely more in my home territory, because Greek myth is something I have looked at before in the course of my studies, but even that was rushed. And that’s not the approach I want to take.

For this year, I’ve set as a goal that I will research and write one article on a mythical creature per month. I will also use that mythical creature as a prompt to write a short story.

The goal here is to give myself enough time to research properly – one month – and end up with articles which are good quality for publication. Given that the schedule for articles on Mythic Scribes means that each article team member puts out approximately one article per quarter, this will also mean I have some buffer, and if there’s a dud in there, an article I’m not happy with or didn’t have the time, that month, to give proper attention to, then it doesn’t matter. I don’t  have to submit it. I can assign another month to have a second shot at it and submit something else.

I have already made a start, yesterday, on my first article on the Phoenix. I did a little digging and found passages from Herodotus, Pliny the Elder, Ovid, Claudian, Aelian, Pope Clement I and more to start things off. I found a book, a lot of which can be read on Google Books, which has some more information, proper academic research, which I will be looking at next. This is the way I want to approach these articles: by finding primary sources and modern commentaries, reading and comparing them, then building up an article based on what I find.

Phoenix-Fabelwesen

It’s interesting, actually. I mean, obviously it’s interesting, or I wouldn’t be doing it. But I was surprised by what I found out about the Phoenix, even in just a few hours’ research. I’ve been aware of the concept of the Phoenix for a long time, having read different version of it in books ever since I was a child. Fawkes from the Harry Potter books was perhaps the main influence on my image of the Phoenix, and because, hey, it’s a firebird, that’s cool, when I first ventured onto the internet I called myself Phoenix. But I had no idea that in classical mythology there was thought to only be one of it, just one solitary example of the species – which, given the way it rejuvenates, shouldn’t really be a surprise. Several of the accounts I’ve read also mention that it is not known to eat or drink anything in the mortal world. That wasn’t even something I’d thought about before.

So I’m feeling pretty good about this goal for my Magical Creatures series. I’ll learn something interesting, I’ll produce work I can be proud of, and I’ll get some fiction written along the way.

And it doesn’t hurt that it gives me an excuse to delve into my much-thumbed, heavily bookmarked copy of Herodotus some more either.