Tag Archives: 30 days

Commentary: Write your novel in 30 days – a 10 step guide (Part 2)

Yesterday I talked about the first five steps of Garda Parker’s advice post, Write your novel in 30 days – a 10 ten guide. Today I’ll look at steps 6 to 10:

6. Write a quick-and-dirty draft

7. Keep your novel to yourself to maintain your excitement and momentum

8. Identify your best time to write

9. Don’t stop to research

10. Understand—and use—manuscript format, even at the draft stage

6. Write a quick-and-dirty draft

Parker certainly offers some good advice here. When you’re writing your first draft, it doesn’t have to be good, you don’t need chapters of equal length and you don’t need to show your eventual publisher what it looks like. I read somewhere a piece of wisdom about a first draft that I think bears repeating:

The only thing a first draft needs to do is exist.

There you go. Because without a first draft, how can you have something to rewrite, to create a second draft from, to edit and pummel into shape? Just focus on creating that first draft.

Continue reading Commentary: Write your novel in 30 days – a 10 step guide (Part 2)

Commentary: Write your novel in 30 days – a 10 step guide (Part 1)

Today I came across a blog post by Garda Parker called Write your novel in 30 days – a 10 step guide. While I agree with some advice here, a lot of it is not useful. In this article, I’ll be looking at the concept and the first five points. In the one that follows I’ll look at points 6 to 10.

For those who don’t want to click that link and read the post, the ten steps are summarised as follows:

1. Know the kind of book you want to write (know your genre)

2. Know your lead character(s)

3. Keep a project notebook

4. Plunge in! (open with a strong scene)

5. Write a set number of pages daily

Continue reading Commentary: Write your novel in 30 days – a 10 step guide (Part 1)